Tag Archives: Browser

Yahoo! Axis Launched

Today Yahoo!  launched Yahoo! Axis  a whole new way to search and browse the Web across any device—Yahoo! Axis. It’s an innovative new mobile browser and desktop plug-in that gives people visual search results (as they type), ultimately providing a more direct path to whatever they’re looking for online. Think of it as a personal companion for your daily explorations of the Web.

You can download Axis as a standalone mobile browser for your Apple iOS devices here, and for major, HTML5 enabled desktop browsers, you can download the desktop plug-in here. Check out our video that walks you through how Axis saves you time whether on the desktop, mobile or tablet device.

Yahoo! Axis comes equipped with handy features that unify searching and browsing.  For example, our one-step search lets you preview and interact with visual search results without ever leaving the page you’re on. It’s the end of the back button! And our instant answers show the information you want as you type common searches like finding movie times, sports scores, stock prices and more.

Axis also includes a personalized home page that contains your most recently visited sites, bookmarks and articles you plan to read later. This personalized home page stays with you across your desktop, iPad and iPhone, keeping what’s important to you in one easy, centralized spot. No matter what device you started on, you can easily pick up where you left off when you switch devices.

Axis even has a few bonus features for iPhone and iPad users, like simple swiping to quickly get from one search result to the next, a bar that combines the search box and address bars into one, and sharing so you can easily post any page you’re viewing to Twitter or Pinterest.

Mozilla firefox 10 released

firefox v10

Another major release by mozilla for firefox on 31th Jan 2012. A gift to firefox lovers with this new version 10.0 . I would like to share some of the key update and few unresolved issues still pending in firefox.

New features in firefox 10.0

  1.  The forward button is now hidden until you navigate back.
  2. Most add ons are compatible with firefox by default now (Good news for add on junkies).
  3. Anti-aliasing for webgl is now implemented (see bug 615976)
  4. CSS3 3D-transforms are now supported (see bug 505115)
  5. HTML 5 New <bdi> element for bi-directional text isolation, along with supporting CSS properties (see bugs 613149 and 662288)
  6. Full Screen APIs allow you to build a web application that runs full screen (see the feature page)
  7. For developers mozilla has added IndexedDB APIs to more closely match the specification.
  8. Inspect too with content highlighting, included new CSS style Inspector.

Fixed issues

  1. Mac OS X only – after installing the latest Java release from Apple, Firefox may crash when closing a tab with a Java applet installed.
  2. Some users may experience a crash when moving bookmarks

Known Unresolved issues

  1. Two-digit browser version numbers may cause a small number of website incompatibilities (see 690287)
  2. If you try to start Firefox using a locked profile, it will crash
  3. For some users, scrolling in the main GMail window will be slower than usual.
  4. Firefox notifications may not work properly with Growl 1.3 or later which has been fixed in firefox 11
  5. Silverlight video may not play on some Macintosh hardware

These are the highlighted new feature, fixed issues and known unresolved issues. This dedication of the firefox developed made firefox one of the best browser in the whole world.

 

Firefox 4 After One Day

Firefox 4 for desktop launched yesterday and the reports says that within 24 hours of being announced it had been downloaded 7.1 million times. This is in addition to the more than 3 million people who were already running the release candidate that became the final version of Firefox 4. Firefox 4 is blazingly fast, cleverly intuitive to use, and for the first time, will be delivered consistently across desktops and mobile devices when Firefox 4 for Android and Maemo lands in the next couple of weeks.

Beyond the obvious, Firefox 4 more profoundly starts the redefinition of the “browser” – from a piece of code traditionally used to simply view, and link to static information, to a trusted environment we live our online lives in, and which we rely on to securely engage with information, applications, friends, colleagues and so much more.

As we do so much more online, we must expect so much more from our browser environment. We should expect it to know who we are, wherever we go. We should expect it to remember such simple things as history, passwords, open tabs, open applications – and remember those on our behalf, wherever we go online, on any device, and without the need to re-enter anything. We should expect it to move at human speed, while being completely customizable and yet so simple and intuitive, anyone can use it. We should expect it to enable us to live in the level of privacy and security WE choose to, everywhere WE go.

In short, we should expect our browser to answer to no one but us!

Mozilla is a community of nearly 50,000 contributors worldwide who come together to build a better Internet that is free, open and accessible to all. If you are one of the more than 400 million users of Firefox already, or if you are brand new to Firefox, welcome to 4, we hope you enjoy the freedom.

 

By

Gary Kovacs

ChromeVis a new Chrome Extension for Users with low Vision

From text that is too small to read, to user interfaces that do not offer keyboard navigation options, users with special needs face a lot of challenges when trying to access websites they are interested in. Google Chrome team believe that extensions can complement the work the team is  doing to make Google Chrome more accessible and can help users with disabilities turn the web from an often unwelcoming place to an environment they can truly enjoy.

Today Google is  launching a new category of featured extensions under the name “Accessibility”. On this page you’ll find ChromeVis a brand new extension from Google that allows users with low vision to magnify and change the color of selected text. You will also find extensions like Chrome Daltonize that can help color blind users to see more details in web pages or gleeBox that provides alternatives to actions traditionally performed via the mouse such as clicking, scrolling and selecting text fields.

All users can benefit from these extensions – not just users with disabilities. To encourage more developers to incorporate best practices in accessibility when designing extensions, Google’ve open sourced the code behind Chrome Vis and created relevant documentation. You can get more information in the Chromium blog.

One can develop a lot of great extensions to benefit users with special needs. Google plan to release a few more in the next months so stay tuned for more updates.

Google Chrome now support Adobe Flash Player

In Google’s most recent stable release of Google Chrome, they talked about beta-testing Adobe Flash Player integration into Chrome. They’ve enable this integration by default in the stable channel of Chrome. To read more about this integration, check out the Chromium blog.

In testing Flash Player integration into Chrome, the Chrome team admittedly spent many, many fun hours with a few of our favorite Flash-based indie games. So as a side project, they teamed up with a few creative folks to build Chrome FastBall, a Flash-based game built on top of the YouTube platform.

If you’re using Chrome, your browser should be automatically updated with Flash Player integration as of this week. And if you haven’t yet tried Chrome, download this newest stable release of the browser at google.com/chrome and take it for a test drive!

Firefox 3.6.4 with Crash Protection Now Available

Today, Mozilla is happy to release Firefox 3.6.4, the latest security and stability release for Firefox, used by nearly 400 million people around the world to browse the Web. This release provides crash protection for Windows and Linux users by isolating third-party plugins when they crash.

Results from our beta testing show Firefox 3.6.4 will significantly reduce the number of Firefox crashes experienced by users who are watching online videos or playing games. When a plugin crashes or freezes while using Firefox, users can enjoy uninterrupted browsing by simply refreshing the page.

Mozilla recognizes that third-party plugins provide important functionality in many of today’s websites. At the same time, plugins can lead to problems for users as they browse. With the ability to automatically alert users when they have out of date plugins, and now crash protection, Firefox 3.6.4 allows users to experience all the content they love without any of the hassles. (If you’re not running Firefox, Mozilla recommends that you make a habit of visiting the Plugin Check page to keep your plugins up to date.)

At this time Firefox offers crash protection for Adobe Flash, Apple Quicktime and Microsoft Silverlight on Windows and Linux computers. Support for other plugins and operating systems will become available in a future Firefox release.

All Firefox users are encouraged to upgrade for free by using the “Check for Updates” function in the Help menu, or by visiting www.firefox.com. For more information, please visit:

Fifa – Chrome Extension

Sore throats from yelling after every goal. Red eyes from waking up too early or staying up too late to watch a game. Sick leaves multiplying during important matches. It’s official: Football fever has spread around the globe, as the 2010 FIFA World Cup™ is already underway.

For those of you who are football fans, kick your game-watching up a notch with the FIFA.com Chrome extension that will help you stay up-to-date with the latest news and scores from South Africa. Most importantly, the extension notifies you when a match is about to begin and displays goal alerts within the browser in real-time for the matches you care about.

From the extension, you can also access match schedules and easily share match scores and personal commentary about specific plays and calls on Facebook, Twitter and Google Buzz. To complement the FIFA.com Chrome extension, you can personalise your browser with one of 32 custom themes that shows your team colors.

You can find the FIFA.com Chrome extension and themes in the World Cup section of the Chrome Extensions gallery. While you’re there, you can also try out more than 5,000 extensions — you may not find one that helps your team perform better on the field, but you’ll likely discover a few that can make your daily browsing more enjoyable. May the best team win!

Firefox to implement calc() in CSS3

I’ve just read last week that Firefox would implement calc() in their new version of Firefox. It’s not out in any publicly released version yet but it is coming as they talked about it on their developers blog.

Why should you care?

Ever had an element that needed to have a percentage width with padding? Up until now, because of the way the box model works in modern browsers, you had to wrap the content in a container to which you’d apply the padding. That’s because when you define padding to an element the value is added to the width, which is the proper way of doing it.

Now the thing is that percentage width don’t mix well with fixed padding values, that where calc() comes into play.

Lets say you have a box with the following css rules:

#box {
padding: 20px;
width: 60%;
}

If that box is in a container 1000 pixels wide, the box would be 640 pixels wide total, that’s not what you want, that’s not 60% wide! You coud use calc() to achieve the desired result:

#box {
width: -moz-calc(60% - 40px);
}

You can even be wild and do basic calculations in there:

#box {
width: -moz-calc(60% - 2 * 20px);
}

Taking it further

What would be even cooler is if you could get the actual padding values as a variable in calc(). Something like:

#box {
width: -moz-calc(60% - (padding-left + padding-right));
}

This way you could even forget about updating your width value when you play with your padding.

Oh well, one day maybe, now let’s just see if other browser vendors implement something of the like. Let’s not forget this is not part of the W3C CSS3 specs.

Is it a feature you were waiting for?

Evolving from beta to stable with a faster version of Chrome

After a bit of evolution and lots of work by the Google team, they thrilled the world by introducing a new stable version of Chrome for Windows, Mac and Linux. Since last December, they’ve been chipping away at bugs and building in new features to get the Mac and Linux versions caught up with the Windows version, and now they finally announce that the Mac and Linux versions are ready for prime time.

Google Chrome for Windows

Google Chrome for Mac

Google Chrome for Linux

The performance bar for all three versions keeps getting higher: today’s new stable release for Windows, Mac and Linux is our fastest yet, incorporating one of Google’s most significant speed improvements to date. Chrome is  improved by213 percent and 305 percent in Javascript performance by the V8 and SunSpider benchmarks since their very first beta, back in Chrome’s Cretaceous period (September 2008). To mark these speed improvements, Google also released a series of three unconventional speed tests for the browser:

(If you’re interested in how Google pitted Chrome against the forces of a potato gun, lightning, and the speed of sound, take a look behind-the-scenes in this video, or read the full technical details in the video’s description drop-down in YouTube).

You may also notice that today’s new stable release comes with a few new features, including the ability to synchronize browser preferences across computers, new HTML5 capabilities and a revamped bookmark manager. For more details, read on in the Google Chrome Blog.

If you haven’t tried Google Chrome since the stone age, check out this brand new stable release. If you’re already using Chrome, you’ll be automatically updated to this new version soon. To try it right away, download the latest version at google.com/chrome.

Opera to “reinvent the Web” on June 16th

Sorry Al Gore, your work here is done. The Internet as we know it will soon to be a thing of the past. No longer will a complex series of interconnected computers following a strict set of protocols connect us to the information we crave, the knowledge we relish and the kitty videos we yearn to “awwwwwwwwwwwwww” at. TCP/IP… Psssshhhh, peace. Copper wire, fiber optic cable… So long, suckas. Opera is about to kick it all to the curb. Or maybe, just maybe, Opera’s PR team is writing checks the company can’t cash and we’re just going to see Opera 10 come out of beta on the 16th. Yeah, that’s way more likely.

Thanks to everyone who sent this in!

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